World Water Day

22 Mar
March 22, is World Water Day, an event established by the United Nations in 1993 to highlight the challenges associated with this precious resource. Each year has a theme, and this year’s is “Water for Cities: Responding to the Urban Challenge.” The UN estimates that more than one in six people worldwide lack access to 20-50 liters (5-13 gallons) of safe freshwater a day to ensure their basic needs for drinking, cooking, and cleaning. And as the world’s population grows beyond 7 billion, clean water is growing scarcer in densely populated areas as well as in remote villages. Collected here are recent images showing water in our lives — how we use it, abuse it, and depend on it.
[[posterous-content:pid___9]]A journalist takes a sample of polluted red water from the Jianhe River in Luoyang, Henan province, China, on December 13, 2011. According to local media, the sources of the pollution were two illegal chemical plants discharging their production wastewater into the rain sewer pipes.
[[posterous-content:pid___8]]Very low water levels in El Atazar’s reservoir near El Berrueco in Madrid, on March 16, 2012. Spanish farmers are already on drought alert after the country’s driest winter in 70 years. Spaniards emerged from their usual sweltering summer last year gasping for rain, but over the past three winter months Spain has had average precipitation of just 55 liters per square meter, far below the average of 200 liters. The latest official drought report on February 22 said Spain’s reservoirs were only two-thirds full, meaning less water for the fields where crops grow and animals graze.
[[posterous-content:pid___6]]Ice chunks break off the Perito Moreno glacier near the city of El Calafate in the Patagonian province of Santa Cruz, Argentina, on March 2, 2012. As Perito Moreno moves forward, it cuts off a river feeding the lake. Water builds up pressure and slowly undermines the ice, forming a tunnel until ice comes tumbling down. The phenomenon repeats itself at irregular intervals; the last major ice falls occurred in 2008.

[[posterous-content:pid___7]]Workers stand in a new addition to the massive underground deep drainage tunnel system in Mexico City, on March 10, 2012. Mexico’s President Felipe Calderon was on hand Saturday to inaugurate the new addition aimed at protecting the metropolitan city and its surrounding areas from flooding.
[[posterous-content:pid___5]]A 70-year-old sunken cemetery emerged after Jablanicko lake dried up near Jablanica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, on February 1, 2012. The dams on the Neretva River near the lake feed a system that normally produces an average of 2,000 megawatt-hours of electricity per year, but the drought that began in August has shrunk output to just a quarter of that amount.
[[posterous-content:pid___4]]
A groom leads his horse through an equine pool on February 2, 2012, in Mumbai, India, after working out on the track during early morning practice for the upcoming Derby race.
[[posterous-content:pid___3]]A worker looks at a photographer from the door of a factory that manufactures screws and nuts, next to a polluted river in Jiaxing, Zhejiang province, China, on March 15, 2012. China’s continuing reliance on heavy industry meant it failed to meet its own targets for cleaning its air and water in 2011.
[[posterous-content:pid___2]]Red polluted water flows from a sewer into the Jian River in Luoyang, north China’s Henan province, on December 13, 2011. According to local media, the sources of the pollution were two illegal chemical plants discharging their production wastewater into the rain sewer pipes. Authorities said they were working to shut them down and disassemble the workshops’ machinery.
[[posterous-content:pid___1]]A boy swims along the algae-filled coastline of Qingdao, Shandong province, China, on July 15, 2011. 
[[posterous-content:pid___0]]
A church drowned within the tailing pond of the Rosia Poieni copper mine next to Lupsa village, 460 km west of Bucharest, Romania, on September 20, 2011. The former village of Geamana was engulfed by copper-mining residues years ago. The tailing pond has a surface of around 250 acres and isfilled with millions of tons of heavy polluted waste.

visit jettab.com for the new JETTAB 2.0 Android tablet

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: